history3.jpg

Thomas Tew, born in Newport, Rhode Island, was one of the first pirates to successfully sail the Pirate Round around the Cape of Good Hope into the Indian Ocean and plunder the treasure ships of the Great Mogul of India.

In 1690, Tew moved to Bermuda to become a privateer. With a commission from Bermuda's Governor Isaac Richier, he set sail to take a French factory on the Gambia River in Africa. But once at sea, Tew told his crew that there was little to be gained in Africa and great danger in gaining it. Instead, he offered them a much more lucrative choice: sail to the Red Sea and plunder the treasure-laden ships of the Great Mogul of India. The proposition was greeted with great cheers and the unified cry, "A gold chain or a wooden leg, we'll stand by you!"

Captain Tew and his pirate crew of forty, emboldened by their new commitment, had the audacity to attack a huge, heavily armed Mogul treasure ship laden with gold, silver, pearls, gems, spices, ivory, and silk. After a brief battle, the 300 turban-clad Indian soldiers dropped their muskets and scimitars and fell to their knees in surrender. No one in Tew's crew was injured.

Tew sailed his eight-gun ship Amity to the tiny island of St. Mary's off the coast of Madagascar where the crew careened the ship, restocked supplies, and divided the plunder. Every man received 3,000 pounds sterling ($3.5 million by today's standards) with a double share for Captain Tew. It was an amazing amount of wealth.

When Tew returned to Rhode Island after his adventure, he was welcomed as a conquering hero and invited to dine with the most prestigious families. Tew, his wife, and two daughters were honored as the special guests of Governor Fletcher of New York. Every colonial wanted to see Tew's riches and hear his tales of Arabia.

In 1694, Tew embarked on another voyage, promising his family it would be his last. Unfortunately, it was. Roving once again in the Red Sea, his sloop was one of a squadron of six pirate ships led by Henry Every attempting to overpower a fleet of Mogul ships. This time his rich dreams were not to become reality.

In September 1695, Tew met his gory demise during the very first exchange of broadsides with the Mogul ships' great guns. His stomach was torn away with a cannon ball and he was said to be holding his bowels in his hands as he hit the quarterdeck. With their famous captain dead, the crew panicked and surrendered their fate to the enemy.

Pirate of the Month

He was captured by the Spaniards in Italy and forced to serve them while chained to their galley.

Read More

Birthday Parties

User Login

Did you know?

  • At the height of its popularity, Port Royal, Jamaica had one drinking house for every ten residents. In July 1661 alone, 41 new licenses were granted to taverns.

  • Pirates wore an earring to ensure they died with at least one piece of treasure to buy their way into 'Fiddler's Green' (sailor's paradise in heaven).

  • The reason you've heard of most well known pirates is that they were captured and killed, or brought to trial where their exploits were recorded. But pirate captain Henry Every was made famous because he evaded capture after his piratical exploits.

  • Many pirates had eye patches, peg legs, or hooks. Ships in the 17th and 18th century were extremely dangerous places to work, so pirates would commonly lose limbs or even eyes during battle. 

Polls

What Pirate Would You Want to Pillage With?